HONORING THE FALLEN: US Military KIA, Iraq & Afghanistan/Pakistan – May 2010

(9 am. – promoted by ek hornbeck)

Honoring the fallen in Afghanistan



Staff Sgt. Rachel Martinez, USAF Photo by SSgt. Matt Davis, USAF NTM-A

31 May 2010 As the sun set over Camp Eggers on Memorial Day, hundreds of coalition members gathered to pay tribute to comrades lost in battle – not just U.S. fallen heroes, but fallen heroes from every nation.

During the coalition memorial remembrance ceremony, service members who gave their life in support of Operation Enduring Freedom were honored with a moment of silence and a roll call of their names during a candlelight ceremony.

“Those that have given their last full measure for this mission are as varied as those that serve here today,” said Army Lt. Gen. William Caldwell IV, NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan and Combined Security Transition Command-Afghanistan commanding general. “Privates to chief warrant officers to lieutenant colonels – from the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Canada, Latvia, the United States and from Afghanistan – they are members of all services, from National Guard, Reserve and Active components.”

While many countries have their own dedicated day set aside to remember the fallen members of their armed forces, special effort was made to include all coalition countries into the Memorial Day remembrance as a sign of the joint effort and sacrifice happening in Afghanistan. Representatives of many coalition nations were present at the ceremony, raising flags, lighting candles and paying their respects. Continued

Iraq, Rapidly becoming the Forgotten War!!

There have been 4,720 coalition deaths — 4,402 Americans, 2 Australians, 1 Azerbaijani, 179 Britons, 13 Bulgarians, 1 Czech, 7 Danes, 2 Dutch, 2 Estonians, 1 Fijian, 5 Georgians, 1 Hungarian, 33 Italians, 1 Kazakh, 1 South Korean, 3 Latvian, 22 Poles, 3 Romanians, 5 Salvadoran, 4 Slovaks, 11 Spaniards, 2 Thai and 18 Ukrainians — in the war in Iraq as of May 5 2010, according to a CNN count. { Graphical breakdown of casualties }. The list also includes 14 U.S. Defense Department civilian employees. At least 31,839 {31,790 last month} U.S. troops have been wounded in action, according to the Pentagon. View casualties in the war in Afghanistan

Staff Sgt.Esau Shalem Atanacio Gonzales 30 White Deer, Texas, USA 38th Explosive Ordnance Disposal Company Died of injuries sustained from a non-combat related incident in Mosul, Iraq, on May 3, 2010

Sgt.Ralph Mena Jr. 27 Hutchinson, Kansas, USA Company A, 72nd Expeditionary Signal Battalion, 7th Signal Brigade, 5th Signal Command Died of injuries sustained from a non-combat related incident in Tikrit, Iraq, on May 4, 2010

Spc.Stanley J. Sokolowski III 26 Ocean, New Jersey, USA Special Troops Battalion, 1st Brigade, 1st Armored Division Died in a non-combat related incident in Kirkuk, Iraq, on May 20, 2010

Staff Sgt.Amilcar H. Gonzalez 26 Miami, Florida, USA 1st Battalion, 64th Armor Regiment, 2nd Heavy Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division Died of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit with small arms fire in Ash Shura near Mosul, Iraq, on May 21, 2010

Maj.Ronald W. Culver Jr. 44 Shreveport, Louisiana, USA 2nd Squadron, 108th Cavalry Regiment, Louisiana Army National Guard Died when insurgents attacked his vehicle with a roadside bomb in Numaniya, Iraq, on May 24, 2010

Pfc.Alvaro R. Regalado Sessarego 37 Virginia Beach, Virginia, USA 1st Battalion, 36th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division Died May 30, 2010, at Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, of injuries sustained from a non-combat related incident at Dahuk, Iraq, on April 18, 2010

POW/MIA

Two U.S. soldiers are currently listed as captured or Duty Status — Whereabouts Unknown as of December 1, 2009. The information below reflects the name, an unknown, officially listed as Prisoners of War or Duty Status — Whereabouts Unknown by the Pentagon.

Spc. Ahmed K. Altaie 41 Army reservist assigned Provincial Reconstruction Team Baghdad Ann Arbor, Michigan On October 23, 2006, Altaie was categorized as Duty Status Whereabouts Unknown when he allegedly was kidnapped while on his way to visit family in Baghdad, Iraq. The Pentagon changed his status to missing-captured on December 11.

Pfc. Bowe R. Bergdahl 23 1st Battalion, 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division Ketchum, Idaho Captured in Paktika province in Afghanistan, on June 30, 2009. The Pentagon declared him Duty Status Whereabouts Unknown on July 1 and his status was changed to Missing-Captured on July 3.

A Brother, from before ours, Finally Comes Home

Soldier Missing From Korean War Identified

The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing in action from the Korean War, have been identified and returned to his family for burial with full military honors.

Army Master Sgt. Roy E. Head of Clinchport, Va., will be buried Saturday in Duffield, Va.  Head was assigned to Headquarters Company, 49th Field Artillery Battalion.  After the 1953 armistice, it was learned from surviving POWs that he had been captured in February 1951, marched north to a POW camp in Suan County, North Korea, and died of malnutrition a few months later. Between 1991 and 1994, North Korea gave the United States 208 boxes of remains believed to contain the remains of 200-400 U.S. servicemen.  North Korean documents turned over with one of the boxes indicated the remains were exhumed near Suan County.  This location correlates with Head’s last known location.  Continued

Afghanistan – Pakistan!!

There have been 1,795 coalition deaths — 1,089 Americans, 11 Australians, 290 Britons, 1 Belgian, 146 Canadians, 3 Czech, 32 Denmark, 24 Netherlands, 4 NATO, 7 Estonians, 1 Finn, 42 French, 42 Germans, 2 Hungarian, 24 Italians, 3 Latvian, 1 Lithuanian,  5 Norwegians, 16 Poles, 2 Portuguese, 13 Romanians, 1 South Korean, 28 Spaniards, 4 Swedes, 2 Turks and three NATO/ISAF — in the war on terror as of May 5 2010, according to a CNN count. Below are the names of the soldiers, Marines, airmen and sailors whose deaths have been reported by their country’s governments. The list also includes two U.S. Defense Department civilian employees. The troops died in support of the U.S.-led Operation Enduring Freedom or were part of the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Afghanistan. At least 6,141 {5,677 last month} U.S. personnel have been wounded in action, according to the Pentagon. In addition to the military deaths, one Jordanian and 11 U.S. intelligence operatives have died in Afghanistan.


Spc.Eric M. Finniginam 26 Colonia, Federated States of Micronesia Company A, 2nd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division Died of wounds sustained when insurgents attacked his unit using indirect fire at Forward Operating Base Blessing in Kunar province, Afghanistan, on May 1, 2010

Cpl.Harvey Alex Holmes 22 Hyde, England Company A, 1st Battalion, The Mercian Regiment Killed when a roadside bomb detonated while he was providing protection for a patrol close to Patrol Base Waterloo in Sangin district, Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 2, 2010

Master Sgt.Mark Wayne Coleman 40 Centerville, Washington, USA Company C, 2nd Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group Died of wounds sustained when enemy forces attacked his unit with a roadside bomb during a patrol in Khakrez, Kandahar province, Afghanistan, on May 2, 2010

Lance Cpl.Barry Buxton 27 Meir, Stoke-on-Trent, England 1st Armoured Engineer Squadron, 21 Engineer Regiment Died of injuries sustained when the vehicle he was commanding rolled into the Nahr-e Bughra canal after the road collapsed in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 3, 2010

Petty Officer 2nd ClassCraig Blake 37 Simcoe, Ontario, Canada Fleet Diving Unit Atlantic, attached to Task Force 1-10 Killed when a roadside bomb detonated during a dismounted operation in the Panjwayi district of Kandahar province, about 15.5 miles (25 km) southwest of Kandahar, Afghanistan, on May 3, 2010

SapperDaryn Roy 28 Consett, County Durham, England 4 Armoured Engineer Squadron, 21 Engineer Regiment Died of injuries sustained when a roadside bomb detonated near his vehicle during a convoy mission in the Nad-e Ali district of Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 3, 2010

Airman 1st ClassAustin Harper Gates-Benson 19 Hellertown, Pennsylvania, USA 54th Combat Communications Squadron, 5th Combat Communications Group, 689th Combat Communications Wing Died of injuries sustained from a non-combat related incident near Khyber, Nangarhar province, Afghanistan, on May 3, 2010

Capt.Brandon Aaron Barrett 27 Marion, Indiana, USA 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force Died following a small arms attack during combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 5, 2010

Lance Cpl.Richard Rees Penny 21 Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force Died while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 6, 2010

Lance Cpl.Christopher Rangel 22 San Antonio, Texas, USA 3rd Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force  Died while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan on May 6, 2010

Spc.Wade Alan Slack 21 Waterville, Maine, USA 707th Ordnance Company, 3rd Ordnance Battalion, 555th Engineer Brigade Died of wounds sustained when insurgents attacked his unit using indirect fire at Jaghatu, Afghanistan, on May 6, 2010

Lance Cpl.Joshua Michael Davis 19 Perry, Iowa, USA 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force Died while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan on May 7, 2010

Capt.Kyle Aaron Comfort 27 Jacksonville, Alabama, USA Company D, 3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment Died of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit using a roadside bomb in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 8, 2010

Cpl.Christopher Lewis Harrison 26 Watford, England Bravo Company, 40 Commando, Royal Marines Killed when a roadside bomb detonated during a patrol near Patrol Base Blenheim, in Sangin, Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 9, 2010

Spc.Jeremy Lynn Brown 20 McMinnville, Tennessee, USA Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 187th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division Died of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit using small arms fire at Contingency Outpost Zerok in Paktika province, Afghanistan, on May 9, 2010

Cpl.Kurt Steven Shea21 Frederick, Maryland, USA 3rd Battalion, 10th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force Died while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 10, 2010

Cpl.Jeffery Warren Johnson 21 Tomball, Texas, USA 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force One of two Marines killed in a roadside bomb attack while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 11, 2010

Sgt.Kenneth Blaine May Jr. 26 Kilgore, Texas, USA 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force One of two Marines killed in a roadside bomb attack while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 11, 2010

Sgt.Joshua David Desforges 23 Ludlow, Massachusetts, USA 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force Died after a roadside bomb detonated while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 12, 2010

Sgt.Donald James Lamar II 23 Fredericksburg, Virginia, USA 1st Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force Died of wounds sustained in a small-arms attack while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 12, 2010

2nd Lt.Valerica Leu 31 Murgeni, Romania Batalionului 33 Manevra (33rd Maneuver Battalion)  Died at a field hospital at Lagman Base of wounds sustained when a roadside bomb detonated in Zabul province, Afghanistan, on May 12, 2010

Pvt.Kevin Thomas McKay 24 Richmond Hill, Ontario, Canada 1st Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry Killed when a roadside bomb detonated during a dismounted night patrol in the Panjwayi district, approximately 9.3 miles (15 km) southwest of Kandahar, Afghanistan, on May 13, 2010

Sgt.Denis Deleon Kisseloff 45 Saint Charles, Missouri, USA 1141st Engineer Company, 203rd Engineer Battalion, Missouri Army National Guard Died of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit using rocket-propelled grenade and small arms fires at Forward Operating Base Shank in Logar province, Afghanistan, on May 14, 2010

Cpl.Nicholas Dimas Parada Rodriguez 29 Stafford, Virginia, USA 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force Died on May 16, 2010, of wounds sustained when a roadside bomb detonated while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 14, 2010

Petty Officer 3rd ClassZarian Andre Wood 29 Houston, Texas, USA Navy corpsman assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force Died of wounds sustained from a roadside bomb blast while on dismounted patrol in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 16, 2010

Staff Sgt.Adam Levi Perkins 27 Antelope, California, USA 7th Engineer Support Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group, I Marine Expeditionary Force Died while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 17, 2010

Sgt.Massimiliano Ramadu 33 Velletri, Italy 32° Reggimento Genio, Brigata Alpina Taurinense (32 Engineer Regiment, Alpine Brigade Taurinense) One of two Italian soldiers killed when their convoy struck a roadside bomb on its way from the western city of Herat to Bala Murghab in northern Afghanistan on May 17, 2010

Pfc.Billy Gene Anderson 20 Alexandria, Tennessee, United States 508th Special Troops Battalion, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division Died of wounds suffered when insurgents attacked his unit with roadside bombs in Badghis province, Afghanistan, on May 17, 2010

Cpl. Maj.Luigi Pascazio 27 Grumo Appula, Italy 32° Reggimento Genio, Brigata Alpina Taurinense (32 Engineer Regiment, Alpine Brigade Taurinense) One of two Italian soldiers killed when their convoy struck a roadside bomb on its way from the western city of Herat to Bala Murghab in northern Afghanistan on May 17, 2010

Lance Cpl.Philip P. Clark 19 Gainesville, Florida, USA 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force Died while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 18, 2010

Sgt.Joshua Abram Tomlinson 24 Dubberly, Louisiana, USA Special Troops Battalion, V Corps One of five U.S. soldiers killed along with a Canadian soldier when a suicide car bomber detonated an explosive device near an ISAF convoy traveling on Darulaman Road in Kabul, Afghanistan, on May 18, 2010

Col.John Michael McHugh46 New Jersey, USA Operations Group Alpha, U.S. Army Battle Command Training Program  One of five U.S. soldiers killed along with a Canadian soldier when a suicide car bomber detonated an explosive device near an ISAF convoy traveling on Darulaman Road in Kabul, Afghanistan, on May 18, 2010

Lt. Col.Paul Robert Bartz43 Waterloo, Wisconsin, USA Headquarters, 10th Mountain Division One of five U.S. soldiers killed along with a Canadian soldier when a suicide car bomber detonated an explosive device near an ISAF convoy traveling on Darulaman Road in Kabul, Afghanistan, on May 18, 2010

Col.Geoff Parker42 Oakville, Ontario, Canada Royal Canadian Regiment, attached to Land Forces Central Area Headquarters Killed along with five U.S. soldiers when a suicide car bomber detonated an explosive device near an ISAF convoy traveling on Darulaman Road in Kabul, Afghanistan, on May 18, 2010

Lt. Col.Thomas Patrick Belkofer44 Perrysburg, Ohio, USA Headquarters, 10th Mountain Division One of five U.S. soldiers killed along with a Canadian soldier when a suicide car bomber detonated an explosive device near an ISAF convoy traveling on Darulaman Road in Kabul, Afghanistan, on May 18, 2010

Lance Cpl.Patrick Xavier Jr. 24 Pembroke Pines, Florida, USA 3rd Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force Died while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 18, 2010

Staff Sgt.Richard James Tieman 28 Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, USA Special Troops Battalion, V Corps One of five U.S. soldiers killed along with a Canadian soldier when a suicide car bomber detonated an explosive device near an ISAF convoy traveling on Darulaman Road in Kabul, Afghanistan, on May 18, 2010

Staff Sgt.Shane Stanley Barnard 38 Desmet, South Dakota, USA 3rd Ordnance Battalion, 71st Ordnance Group Died of wounds sustained when he stepped on a secondary roadside bomb in Zabul province, Afghanistan, on May 19, 2010

Cpl.Stephen Walker 42 Lisburn, Northern Ireland Company A, 40 Commando, Royal Marines Killed when a roadside bomb detonated during a joint Afghan-British patrol near Patrol Base Almas in Sangin, Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 21, 2010

Pfc.Jason D. Fingar 24 Columbia, Missouri, USA 4th Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment, 5th Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 2nd Infantry Division Died of wounds sustained when his military vehicle struck a roadside bomb in Durai, Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 22, 2010

Capt.Christophe Barek-Deligny 38 Paris, France 22e Compagnie d’Appui, 3e Régiment du Génie (22nd Support Company, 3rd Engineer Regiment) Killed along with a Dutch soldier and an Afghan interpreter when their vehicle struck a roadside bomb in Uruzgan province, Afghanistan, on May 22, 2010

Cpl.Luc Janzen 25 Netherlands 42 Pantserinfanteriebataljon (42nd Armored Infantry Battalion)  Killed along with a French soldier and an Afghan interpreter when their vehicle struck a roadside bomb in Uruzgan province, Afghanistan, on May 22, 2010

Pfc.Christopher R. Barton 22 Concord, North Carolina, USA C Troop, 1st Squadron, 33rd Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division Died of wounds sustained when insurgents attacked his unit using small arms fire in Khost province, Afghanistan, on May 24, 2010

TrooperLarry John Zuidema Rudd 26 Brantford, Ontario, Canada Royal Canadian Dragoons, serving with 1st Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment Killed when a roadside bomb detonated during a routine security operation, about 12.4 miles (20 km) southwest of Kandahar, in the Panjwayi district of Kandahar province, Afghanistan, on May 24, 2010

Sgt.Edwin Rivera 28 Waterford, Connecticut, USA 1st Battalion, 102nd Infantry Regiment, Connecticut Army National Guard Died May 25, 2010, at National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, of wounds sustained on May 20, 2010, when his unit was attacked by enemy forces using indirect fire at Contingency Outpost Xio Haq in Laghman province, Afghanistan

Cpl.Stephen Paul Curley 26 Exeter, Devon, England Company C, 40 Commando, Royal Marines Killed when a roadside bomb detonated during a foot patrol in the Sangin area of Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 26, 2010

GunnerZak Cusack 20 Stoke-on-Trent, England 4th Regiment, Royal Artillery, asssigned to Combined Force Nahr-e Saraj (South) Killed during a small arms fire engagement with insurgent forces in an area around Enezai Village, Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 26, 2010

Cpl.Jacob C. Leicht 24 College Station, Texas, USA 1st Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force Died following a roadside bomb attack while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 27, 2010

Pfc.Jake W. Suter 18 Los Angeles, California, USA Company L, 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment, 3rd Marine Division, III Marine Expeditionary Force Died while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 29, 2010

Lance Cpl.Anthony A. Dilisio 20 Macomb, Michigan, USA 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force Died while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 30, 2010

MarineScott Gregory Taylor 20 Buxton, Derbyshire, England Company A, 40 Commando, British Royal Marines Killed when a roadside bomb detonated during a foot patrol in the area around Sangin, Helmand province, Afghanistan, on May 30, 2010

PTSD – TBI and more

Vietnam Combat Lessons Apply Today, Mullen Says


1 June 2010 WASHINGTON, June 1, 2010 – The military’s top officer yesterday called on Vietnam veterans to stay connected with today’s servicemembers, saying their lessons learned, especially with post-traumatic stress disorder, can help veterans of combat in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, made the comments as he led a Memorial Day observance at the Vietnam War Memorial here just before six names of fallen Vietnam veterans were added to the iconic, black marble wall.

“The Vietnam conflict was a life-defining experience for every American who lived during that era, and it continues to impact us all: the pain, the conflict, the healing,” Mullen said, noting that Vietnam was his first war experience. “The lessons we learned in Vietnam were bought at a very great price. Acting on them is the best tribute we can pay to honor those who died.”

Mullen noted that he and his wife, Deborah, came to The Wall after touring Arlington National Cemetery’s Section 60 where many Vietnam veterans are buried near those fallen in Iraq and Afghanistan. “As we come to this very hallowed ground, in ways it is like coming home,” he said. “I, too, have friends on The Wall. I have classmates on The Wall.” Continued

New law helps veterans through post-combat transition


June 03, 2010 Since former President George W. Bush launched a war against terrorism in the Middle East, more than a million Americans have donned the nation’s military uniform and served in Afghanistan and Iraq.

President Barack Obama signed the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act into law. It is Congress’ attempt to pave the way for the transition of those service members back into civilian life.

“We’re forever mindful that our obligations to our troops don’t end on the battlefield,” Obama said. “Just as we have a responsibility to train and equip them when we send them into harm’s way, we have a responsibility to take care of them when they come home.”

He’s right, and S. 1963, the federal legislation that passed Congress unanimously and was signed into law by the president on May 4, is definitely a step in the right direction. Continued

Where to Get Help for PTSD


If you are in crisis, please call 911, go to your nearest Emergency Room, or call 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255)(Spanish/Español 1-888-628-9454).

Veterans, press “1” after you call — or go to Veterans Suicide Prevention Hotline to chat live with a crisis counselor at any time of day or night.

Because the National Center for PTSD has emerged as the world’s expert on PTSD and traumatic stress, many people ask if the National Center provides direct treatment services. The National Center for PTSD does not provide direct clinical care or individual referrals. We do provide links and information to help you locate VA and other mental health services in your area. Continued

VA PTSD Program Locator

Homeless veterans to get housing aid


June 3, 2010 Nearly 8,000 homeless veterans will receive permanent housing vouchers, according to an announcement today by Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan.

Snip

HUD is making $58.6 million available to various state and city agencies in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Guam, that work with Veterans Administration Medical Centers to be used exclusively to subsidize housing for eligible veterans.

“The homeless vet needs to be plugged into the VA system in order to receive the voucher,” said Donna White, a spokesperson for HUD. “The VA’s only requirement is that the veteran participate in a VA case management program.” Continued

PTSD: New War on An Old Foe Big changes underway at the VA could mean better treatment for thousands of vets. A bureaucracy in transition.

Remarks by the President at Signing of Caregives and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act

5 May 2010 1:29 P.M. EDT


President Obama greets Chairman Akaka following the signing ceremony in the State Dining Room of the White House, as Secretary Shinseki and Second Lady Dr. Jill Biden look on from the left.

THE PRESIDENT:  Good afternoon, everyone.  Danny Akaka, aloha.  (Laughter.)  Since the 9/11 attacks more than eight years ago, the United States has been a nation at war.  In this time, millions of Americans have worn the uniform.  More than a million have served in Afghanistan and Iraq.  Many have risked their lives.  Many have given their lives.  All are the very embodiment of service and patriotism.  And as a grateful nation, humbled by their service, we can never honor these American heroes or their families enough.

Along with their loved ones, we give thanks every time our men and women in uniform return home.  But we’re forever mindful that our obligations to our troops don’t end on the battlefield.  Just as we have a responsibility to train and equip them when we send them into harm’s way, we have a responsibility to take care of them when they come home.

As Michelle and Dr. Biden have reminded us in all their visits to military bases and communities, our obligations must include a national commitment to inspiring military families — the spouses and children who sacrifice as well. Continued Here

Landmark Bill Bolsters Care for Female Veterans


President Barack Obama signs the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act in the State Dining Room of the White House

Olivier Douliery / Getty Images

America’s daughters have been serving in the U.S. military for centuries, and they’re being deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan in unprecedented numbers. But back home, they’re still not guaranteed that the bathrooms at veterans’ health care centers will be stocked with tampons. The Government Accountability Office published an audit this spring that found some of 19 health care facilities it surveyed did not always have private bathing areas, even in mixed-gender units. Such lapses in women’s health care are growing more painfully apparent as the number of females using the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system is projected to double in the next five years. But in a landmark step toward addressing their needs, President Obama Wednesday afternoon signed a bill bolstering care for female veterans, which was part of the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act of 2010. Article Continues

VA Updates Online Application for Health Benefits


May 5, 2010 Veterans will find it easier and faster to apply for their health care benefits now that the Department of Veterans Affairs has updated its online Form 10-10EZ, “Application for Health Benefits.”  

“VA is committed to tapping into the best that technology has to offer to ensure Veterans receive the benefits they have earned,” said Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric K. Shinseki. “We continue to look for new ways to improve access to care and benefits.”

This revised online application provides enhanced navigation features that make it easier and faster for Veterans to apply for their health care benefits.  This new version also allows Veterans to save a copy of the completed form for their personal records.

The most significant enhancement allows Veterans to save their application to their local desktop and return to the application at any time without having to start over.  Previously, Veterans had to complete the form in a single session.

This updated online form, along with the revised VA Form 10-10EZ, reduces the collection of information from Veterans by eliminating some questions.

In addition, there are minor changes to simplify the wording of questions and provide clarity in the instructions.  Further enhancements to the online application are expected to be delivered in increments throughout 2010.  

Veterans may complete or download the 10-10EZ form at the VA health eligibility website.  Veterans may also contact VA at 1 (877) 222-8387 (VETS) or visit the VA health eligibility website.

Civilian Casulties – Iraq

Just Foreign Policy Issues

Over a million {*1,366,350 plus} Iraqis are estimated to have been killed as a result of the U.S.-led invasion and occupation. Learn More and Take Action»

*Estimate, click for explaination


.

To

John Hopkins School of Public Health { October 11, 2006 report } puts the count at 650,000, with a range from 400,000 to 900,000.

Civilian Casulties – Afghanistan


Civilian casualties of the War in Afghanistan (2001-present)

The War in Afghanistan (2001-present) has caused the deaths of thousands of Afghan civilians directly from insurgent and foreign military action, as well as the deaths of possibly tens of thousands of Afghan civilians indirectly as a consequence of displacement, starvation, disease, exposure, lack of medical treatment, crime and lawlessness resulting from the war. The war, launched by the United States as “Operation Enduring Freedom” in 2001, began with an initial air campaign that almost immediately prompted concerns over the number of Afghan civilians being killed[1] as well as international protests. With civilian deaths from airstrikes rising again in recent years[2], the number of Afghan civilians being killed by foreign military operations has led to mounting tension between the foreign countries and the government of Afghanistan. In May 2007, President Hamid Karzai summoned military commanders to warn them of the consequences of further deaths.[3]……..>>>>>

Exact Count of Civilian Casulties may never be known, as is the case in every conflict, especially an Invasion by another Country. For it is the Innocent Civilians and those Defending their Countries {of which All would be counted if this land were ever invaded} who suffer the most, during and long after!

UNHCR – Refugees and more, Afghanistan and Iraq

Iraq Refugees UNHCR – Iraq: UNHCR Global Appeal 2008-2009 – Iraq Situation

Afghanistan Refugees UNHCR – Afghanistan UNHCR Global Appeal 2008-2009 – Afghanistan Situation

All the Deaths, Maimings and Destruction are the Blood on All Our Hands, No One can Escape that Guilt!

The Fallen of Afghanistan and Iraq

April 2010***March 2010***February 2010***January 2010***December 2009***November 2009***October 2009***September 2009***August 2009***July 2009***June 2009***May 2009***April 2009***March 2009***February 2009***January 2009***December 2008***November 2008***October 2008***September 2008***August 2008***July 2008***June 2008***May 2008***April 2008***March 2008***Febuary 2008***January 2008***December 2007***November 2007***October 2007***September 2007***August 2007***July 2007***June 2007***May 2007***April 2007***March 2007***Feb. 2007***Jan. 2007***2006***2005***2004***2003



National World War II Memorial



National Korean War Memorial



National Vietnam Veterans Memorial – The Wall



The Vietnam Women’s Memorial

Department of Veterans Affairs National Cemeteries

PBS’s ‘This Emotional Life’: Memorial Day — Remembering Military Suicides


For some families, this Memorial Day will be especially hard. Their loved ones didn’t die the hero’s death. They were one of 160 soldiers last year who committed suicide, despite the military’s unprecedented effort to stem the tide. Continued

The War in Iraq Costs, the rolling tabulation, over $726,377,572,532++++ and continually counting!

CNN-Iraq and Afghanistan War Casulties

In Remembrance – Moving Tributes



97 percent {now more} of U.S. deaths in Iraq have occurred after George W. Bush declared an end to “major combat.”

“Mission Accomplished!”

GOP Congressmen Say That ‘Everyone’ In Congress ‘Would Agree That Iraq Was A Mistake’

“Victory means exit strategy, and it’s important for the president to explain to us what the exit strategy is,”  – George W. Bush, Texas Gov., 1999

The Rand Corporation Terrorism Report the press release here, you can get the  full document here or a summary of the research brief here

“What is the difference between an al Qaida terrorist and a misguided American terrorist?” “The planes they fly!”

“How anyone can say that torture keeps Americans safe is beyond me — unless you don’t count American soldiers as Americans.”

Matthew Alexander who is writing under a pseudonym for security reasons

“Torture is the tool of the lazy, the stupid, and the pseudo-tough. It’s also perhaps the greatest recruiting tool that the terrorists have.”

Major General Paul Eaton

Done “In Our Names”!

The Failed Policies will Haunt Us and the World for Decades, This Time!!

1 comment

    • jimstaro on June 5, 2010 at 5:11 pm
      Author

    Name of Soldier listed above:

    Soldier’s funeral to include 22-mile procession

    The funeral and burial of a Cabarrus County soldier who was killed last month in action in Afghanistan is set for this afternoon and will include a 22-mile procession across parts of Mecklenburg and Cabarrus counties.

    Pfc. Christopher Barton, 22, was killed May 24 in Khowst province when his unit was attacked by insurgents. The funeral service is scheduled for 1 p.m. at Idlewild Baptist Church, on Idlewild Road near Matthews-Mint Hill Road. Continued

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