We’ll Take a Cup of Kindness Yet . . .

(Sentiments like this, not stories about Acoustic Kitties, ought to be at the top of the page tonight – promoted by Unitary Moonbat)

Too many New Year’s Eves will come and go before humanity drinks from that Cup of Kindness Robert Burns spoke of in his classic poem, “Auld Lang Syne”.  Tragically, that moment may never come to pass, but if it does someday, it will be because people in this troubled world finally listened to poets, writers, singers and songwriters, and heeded the words of truth and wisdom they’ve been offering ever since the first warrior of the first king died for nothing on the first battlefield.        

In Artists of Resistance, Howard Zinn emphasizes the social and political importance of modern poets and painters, singers, songwriters, novelists and playwrights, for they can speak to the world with an artistic eloquence that transcends standard political discourse.  Their ability to communicate universal truths on a deeply personal level through compelling poetry, prose and music is not only inspiring, it insulates them against reactionary assault as they defend the oppressed and condemn their oppressors.

As our world descends into chaos, artists are struggling to reclaim the influence they once had on society, but their voices can rarely be heard above the din of distracting noise blaring day and night from several billion tv’s, radios, CD players, iPods, computer games, cell phones, and other electronic wonders purchased with such compulsion and “paid for” with plastic.  Artists will always strive to be the conscience of the human race, but hundreds of millions of human beings corporate propaganda targets have been psychologically conditioned with such pervasive intensity by Madison Avenue marketers that reactionary economic and political elites from Washington to Beijing no longer have to oppress them, they’re oppressing themselves.  

Eddie Vedder has some thoughts to share with us regarding this dehumanizing self-oppression that’s been spreading like a viral infection through the bloodstream of humanity . . .  

Every time our trustworthy media broadcasts the lies of the fascist fornicators responsible for this globalized clusterfuck, my thoughts begin to bleed.  This presents me with two choices.  I can either write an essay, or join the commuters riding in scenic splendor down I-666, where everyone ends up at the same destination no matter which exit they take . . .

Prozac Nation

Playwright Eugene O/Neill experienced similar cerebral discomfort in 1942 when the pre-fascist Allied powers were fighting the currently fascist Axis powers because the economic elites of these warring nations hadn’t conceived of globalization yet, and didn’t realize that exploiting billions of people until they’re dead would be much more cost-effective and profitable than killing millions of each other’s workers on battlefields.  As the carnage of that global conflict intensified, O’Neill observed that neither the cannon makers nor the cannon fodder seemed to be even remotely aware of their mutually destructive stupidity:    

It is like acid always burning in my brain that the stupid butchering of the last war taught men nothing at all, that they sank back listlessly on the warm manure pile of the dead and went to sleep, indifferently bestowing custody of their future, their fate, into the hands of state departments, whose members are trained to be conspirators, card sharks, double-crossers, and secret betrayers of their own people; into the hands of greedy capitalist ruling classes so stupid they could not even see when their own greed began devouring itself; into the hands of that most debased type of pimp, the politician, and that most craven of all lice and job-worshippers, the bureaucrats.

O’Neill not only possessed immense literary talent and perceptive powers of observation, he had the moral courage to tell the harsh truth about the degeneration of human society and its suicidal submission to debased pimps parading around as leaders. He didn’t sugarcoat the truth with polite euphemisms, he had no interest in indulging hypocrites or in currying favor with “realists” too busy admiring their imaginary sophistication to notice all the blood on their hands.

I’ve noticed the blood on their hands, and I’m going to keep on noticing it.          

Unlike some blogs, where electing more and better types of debased pimp politicians has been ordained as the solution to this planetary clusterfuck caused by supporting debased pimp politicians who pretend they’re not debased pimp politicians, Docudharma encourages a different approach featuring actual thinking, which has been known to provide actual solutions.  

Here’s a solution with some potential:

Integrity

And here’s a New Year’s resolution with some potential:

No more turning away,

From the pale and downtrodden.

No more turning away,

From the weak and the weary.

No more turning away,

From the coldness inside.

Be artists, be writers, be poets,

Be the new wind of change

On the wings of the night.

55 comments

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    • Rusty1776 on December 31, 2007 at 2:23 am
      Author
  1. What makes me the most frustrated with the “netroots” (i.e., elect more and better Dems) is that they are simply blind to the fact that the politicians in Congress have broken, no smashed the heart of the Democratic party with their actions.

    It’s not purity, nor faith-based thinking, nor impracticality.  The fantasy is that they think it will not matter.

    I couldn’t agree more with what you have said.

    • Alma on December 31, 2007 at 2:50 am

    you did it again.

    I love the Integrity pic, and quote.

  2. And from Madeleine L’Engle (may she rest in peace):

    Our truest responsibility to the irrationality of the world is to paint, or sing, or write, for only in such response do we find the truth.

    I too am grateful for a place that is struggling to find the answers rather than repeating the same thing over and over with no positive results. You know what they say about that, don’t you?

  3. Yesterday, I caught a little of the FDL book salon,   hosted by Nyceve.  The salon’s guest was Bruce Levin, whose book, “Surviving America’s Depression Epidemic”.  

    I haven’t read the book, and the discussion only touched on the effect of political powerlessness on depression. But nyceve highlighted this quote in her post:

    “…Depression is highly associated with the experience of hopelessness and helplessness, and politics is all about power. In genuine democracy, people don’t merely get to vote but instead they have a real sense that they actually have an impact on their society. When you are voting, year after year, for the lesser-of-two-evils, neither of whom you support and both of whom are in the pocket of corporations and wealthy individuals, you don’t experience an y real political power. Politics is all about power, and depression is largely about powerlessness…”

    The nugget of hope that I take away from my skimming of the post is this comment by nyceve:

    “…Although anger is not the most fun way in the world to get energized, I must confess that when I’ve had little else to motivate me, I have used anger to get a few things done.” Dr. Levine has convinced me that anger can be turned into a positive force for political activism. I certainly believe that my anger keeps me plugging away…”

    I don’t know if I want to stay “angry” all the time(too draining & hard on the BP) 😉  but I sure don’t want to just give up either.

    • kj on December 31, 2007 at 4:06 am

    What a sentence!  

    Playwright Eugene O/Neill experienced similar cerebral discomfort in 1942 when the pre-fascist Allied powers were fighting the currently fascist Axis powers because the economic elites of these warring nations hadn’t conceived of globalization yet, and didn’t realize that exploiting billions of people until they’re dead would be much more cost-effective and profitable than killing millions of each other’s workers on battlefields.  

    • RiaD on December 31, 2007 at 4:12 am

    O rusty!

    this is just amazing…

    you’ve left me speechless

  4. few up my sleeve for you!!!!

    Rusty, this was par excellence.  

    I recall so well how it has always been the artists, i.e., the musicians, the poets, the actors et al, who always were the BIGGEST voices of all in bygone conflicts to our democracy.  Yes, they are still here today, but in no way representative in the largesse the same as in the past.

    Have all the VOICES begun to lose their VOICES?

    Ray McGovern has an excellent article entitled “Creeping Fascism: Lessons From the Past”

    “There are few things as odd as the calm, superior indifference with which I and those like me watched the beginnings of the Nazi revolution in Germany, as if from a box at the theater…Perhaps the only comparably odd thing is the way that now, years later….”

    Thanks, Rusty!

    • kj on December 31, 2007 at 4:31 am

    Their ability to communicate universal truths on a deeply personal level through compelling poetry, prose and music is not only inspiring, it insulates them against reactionary assault as they defend the oppressed and condemn their oppressors.

    not insulation from the trauma, but insulation from the assault on the expression of trauma, or truth, or beauty.  Like OPOL’s video tonight.  The connection to that time, or those hopes and those losses is a strength, no matter how much it hurts. It is a strength because we know there were those whose shoulders, or graves, we stand on today.  We didn’t forget.

  5. and slated to be replaced by a CVS.

    The right wing local FM propaganda station has regular ads for medical guinea pigs.

    Trade magazines for the electronics industry call for an increase in technological indoctrination in the concept of “service acceptance”.  Commercials on your cell phone.

    http://www.eetimes.com/news/la

    Let’s hope the price of gas prevents widespread acceptance of these new technologies.

    I have been told $400 dollars will build an EMP device with the capacity to fry chips over wide areas and maybe this would be the salvation of man after all.

    • feline on December 31, 2007 at 5:56 am

    This one has a lot of Soul.

    • pfiore8 on December 31, 2007 at 6:44 am

    we just need it to be quiet

    so we can think through and past

    all the crap with which are bombarded

    … always love your stuff rusty

  6. You prove that hope is not lost.

    This is a wonderful affirmation that there is a path to a better world, apart from the one that`s being sold to us. (the glittery one, with another 200 billion ribbon)

    What a way to start a Happy New Year to you & yours & everybody here.

    • Temmoku on January 1, 2008 at 6:38 am

    Thanks.

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