Revulsion Begets Revolution

(WARNING: This essay contains VERY graphic images. And in the interest of accuracy, please note the authors disclaimer:

Disclaimer: Some of these particular images below have had their validity questioned and lacking citation, the author of this essay wishes you to consider them to be used in this instance as “examples” of rape behavior by soldiers.  

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– promoted by buhdydharma )

The Anti-War Movement: Hippies had it Right.

God, how I miss OPOL.

“But you know, if you wanna end war and stuff, you have to sing loud,” said Arlo. And end a war they did. It was not only by song, not only by protest, it was by the barrage of the REALITY of the horrors of war that woke the American People up to Vietnam.

It was the IMAGES.



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I think that the American public doesn’t want to look at the horrors anymore. It would make it too hard to exist. Too hard to breathe easy over their lattes, doing nothing about it. They are too worried about keeping their jobs to think about much else.

You see, if they saw CURRENT images, such as this, in Obama’s Bagram, done by the US military, they would have to admit we are the barbarians we are supposed to stand against. We are the monsters.



bagram



Revulsion begets Revolution.

The First Step is Admitting You Have a Problem.

Disclaimer: Some of these particular images below have had their validity questioned and lacking citation, the author of this essay wishes you to consider them to be used in this instance as “examples” of rape behavior by soldiers. ~ Diane

 

You see, I think the Non-interventionist US blinders that made us delay getting into WWII, the very preconceived notion that “No one would actually do that,” DENIAL, wasn’t truly awoken until the images from Auschwitz started to roll in.

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I think the famous images from Hiroshima woke people to the reality that using Atomic weaponry that melted civilians was horrific, and should never happen again.

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I think these images alone brought Vietnam to an end. The body bags, and coffins….

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the children….

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the horrors of the REALITY that is war….

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Without the REVULSION, without the awakening of our common humanity, we would not have collectively rejected our presence in Vietnam.

We would have kept watching Ed Sullivan and while muttering about the sickness in the world, we would NOT have done this:

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and this…

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And, when, when the PTB tried to put down our resistence, this image made even the straightest and conservatives decry shooting our children down on campuses.

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We remembered the GREATER GOOD, throughout all of this.

Now, the press is quieted.

Now the conservatives say images would endanger our troops.

Now, they have convinced Liberals that “war porn” is something we enjoy in some dirty voyeuristic way, and that we must protect the people in these images.

I say, no. Press, show the images.

I say the torture and our silent complicity endangers our troops more than the images and our OUTRAGE and DENUNCIATION of such acts.

I say every human in the images above are HISTORICAL HEROES in that the capture of their demise ensured NO MORE would suffer the same fate.

There IS a Greater Good.

These are the images that brought our all-too-brief objection to the Iraqi war.

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This image of before and after of Rachel Corrie woke people up to the brutality of the “settlement” complete disregard of life of Israel’s extremists.

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The problem, you see, is these images are shown almost solely on the internet.

The MSM will not show them.

Now we are burning bodies in mass graves in Afghanistan, while jeering the people who live there who wish only to bury their beloved dead in accordance with their beliefs.

afghani dead burning

This is who we are? Is this who we would be if every television set in American showed us the reflection of what we’ve become?

Our soldiers group raping women?

Does not seeing this REVOLT us? It should, and our REVULSION should bring REVOLUTION!

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What kind of world is it, to hide the penis of the rapist, yet show the degradation, the abject horror on the victims face?  Are they protecting the privacy of an American Rapist?

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I’m sorry.

This is Afghanistan.



This is the human face of drone bombings.

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This is Torture:

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THESE IMAGES SHOULD REVOLT US ENOUGH FOR REVOLUTION.

It worked for the Hippies.

History proves, people.

Humans can block, compartmentalize and justify many things they do not witness.

But make us witness horrors done in OUR name?

Our humanity awakens.

We get PISSED OFF.

We say:

NO MORE!!!!!!!!

Dig?

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101 comments

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    • Diane G on October 22, 2009 at 4:21 pm
      Author

    The Public needs to hurt.

    The Public needs to STOP war and torture.

    The Public has to be woken at any expense.

    I understand opposing points of view, but have thought long and hard about this, and my position is set in stone.

    I will accept criticism without rancor equally without rancor, but I find it is usually more productive to make a counter-point essay if one feels strongly in an opposite position rather than just harp at one another.

    It keeps the Peace.

    Peace,

    D

  1. a kick in the gut for us all.

    Powerful, powerful imagery.

    Go to the mirror and take a look at yourself, take a deep look into your eyes. It is there, there deep inside each of us. Take a look, some admit it, some won’t, but it is there.

    How can Obama sleep at night? How can we sleep at night?

    Morris was right, we are The Naked Ape.

    Thank you, Diane. Thank you for reminding me that is I, that it is you, that it is all of us.

    • ANKOSS on October 22, 2009 at 5:43 pm

    In 1637, English soldiers massacred some 700 Pequot men, women and children at Mystic Fort, burning many of them alive in their homes and shooting those who fled. The colony of Connecticut and Massachusetts Bay Colony observed a day of thanksgiving commemorating the massacre. By 1675, there were some 50,000 colonists in the place they had named “New England.” That year, Metacom, a son of Massasoit, one of the first whose generosity had saved the lives of the starving settlers, led a rebellion against them. By the end of the conflict known as “King Philip’s War,” most of the Indian peoples of the Northeast region had been either completely wiped out, sold into slavery, or had fled for safety into Canada. Shortly after Metacom’s death, Plimoth Colony declared a day of thanksgiving for the English victory over the Indians.

    source: http://www.oyate.org/resources

    The “public” views the torture and killing of enemies as necessary and often glorious. That is why there is no accountability in America for torture and why the forever war continues.

    • Edger on October 22, 2009 at 5:49 pm

    The Other War: Iraq Vets Bear Witness
    Chris Hedges & Laila Al-Arian
    The Nation, July 9, 2007

    These convoys are the arteries that sustain the oc­cupation, ferrying items such as water, mail, maintenance parts, sewage, food and fuel across Iraq.

    These convoys, ubiquitous in Iraq, were also, to many Iraqis, sources of wanton destruction.

    According to descriptions culled from interviews with thirty-eight veterans who rode in convoys–guarding such runs as Kuwait to Nasiriya, Nasiriya to Baghdad and Balad to Kirkuk–when these columns of vehicles left their heavily fortified compounds they usually roared down the main supply routes, which often cut through densely populated areas, reaching speeds over sixty miles an hour.

    Governed by the rule that stagnation increases the likelihood of attack, convoys leapt meridians in traffic jams, ignored traffic signals, swerved without warning onto sidewalks, scattering pedestrians, and slammed into civilian vehicles, shoving them off the road. Iraqi civilians, including children, were frequently run over and killed. Veterans said they sometimes shot drivers of civilian cars that moved into convoy formations or attempted to pass convoys as a warning to other drivers to get out of the way.

    Sergeant Flatt recalled an incident in January 2005 when a convoy drove past him on one of the main highways in Mosul. “A car following got too close to their convoy,” he said. “Basically, they took shots at the car. Warning shots, I don’t know. But they shot the car. Well, one of the bullets happened to just pierce the windshield and went straight into the face of this woman in the car. And she was–well, as far as I know–instantly killed. I didn’t pull her out of the car or anything. Her son was driving the car, and she had her–she had three little girls in the back seat. And they came up to us, because we were actually sitting in a defensive position right next to the hospital, the main hospital in Mosul, the civilian hospital. And they drove up and she was obviously dead. And the girls were crying.

    Read the whole article at The Nation.

    • icosa on October 22, 2009 at 6:47 pm

    that say they are proud to be American.  I have never seen many of these pictures.  These soldiers will live with their memories and many unsuspecting people will suffer because of who they have become.  I do not believe they have feelings.  I often wonder how they will feel when someone blows their childrens’ heads off, will they have pain or just laugh.  Methinks they will laugh.

    • Inky99 on October 22, 2009 at 8:38 pm

    If I remember correctly they’re either from some porno movie, or they’re from some other war, not involving US troops.

    You might consider removing those until you know for certain.

    • TMC on October 22, 2009 at 10:19 pm

    How well I have learned that lesson. The only way that this will stop is for Americans to see what was done on their name. The only way there will be an outcry for the prosecution of the war criminals, the Bush/Cheney Cabal, us for Americans and the world to see those pictures in all their horror, gore and shame.  

  2. The pictures need to be plastered all over the USofA so no one can escape and say they didn’t see them.

    Someone said to me it’s a privacy issue and she was sure the victims didn’t want the pictures to be shown. I called BS, because I know my family wanted everybody to see and be held accountable. They wanted justice for the ones they lost.

    It’s the reason this will never happen again in Germany. The people could not deny what was done in their name and for many with their approval. It was hard on the ones who fought against the regime, they were thrown in the pot with the rest of them. It was worth it, we got justice.

  3. These should be posted on every front page of blogs & be required viewing on TV stations across the nation as long as adequate warnings were stated to protect the innocent children.

    I`m fine with your disclaimer to present some of these images as examples, but I`ve seen just as many (some possibly worse) that are not “examples”.

    I agree with you & your essay all day long.

    Thank you for it.

  4. serves the globalist purpose well.  The irony of our saving grace does in fact rely on the sheeple not knowing and or giving a rats ass about world affairs and those sheeple just carrying on like nothing is happening.  Hence the very popular swine vaccine eugenics program.  Wiping out the measly 307 million Americans who think they are Free and consume outlandish world resources does ensure the elite parasites stay at the top of the food chain.

  5. WAR CRIMES TRIALS NOWWWWWWW!!!

    • Miep on October 23, 2009 at 5:01 am

    recced the essay, posted this comment:

    thanks for doing this Ria

    and here we are back to discussing rape photos again.

    I see some people would object to pornographic gang rape photos being published, instead of real gang rape photos (assuming that’s really what’s happening here).

    But everybody knows that the rapes really happened, and that our government is making sure we can’t have access to the photos of such atrocities.

    I’m equally sure the people who make the porn versions are quite careful to get it right.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Best I could do.

  6. One of our most prominent characteristics “at war” was/is rape.  Almost as though rape, in war times, was a constitutional right.  Has everyone forgotten the little kids born of Korean/American parentages?  Did you never see the “cages” these unwanted children grew up in?  The same thing in Vietnam — again, children that were not wanted by either the Vietnamese or the Americans, but at the behest, I think, it was Carter (not sure), there began a campaign to bring those children to the U.S. and find their fathers and find nurture for them.  It was a heart-warming story, but just a drop in the bucket, as far as I’m concerned.  In every way possible, WAR is an abomination and an indication that we really, despite all our so-called advancements, are not any more civilized than the cavemen, and, just, maybe, we are less so than the cavemen!  

  7. cant someone please articulate this better than me?

    What a frikkin absurd perverted obscene disconnect when… photos. photos of women being raped and abused by men in uniform … whether it’s “real” or “fake”, posed, staged, or what… its porn.

    I mean… staging and  faking such a thing… how fucking sick is that?! god damn.

    doing it is evil. witnessing it is evil. taking a digital photo of it is evil. publishing the photo for porn purposes  is evil. viewing/sharing the photo for porn is evil. staging such a scene, fake, for porn, is evil. doing it for real, in some dark foreign land, to some vague unknown “enemy” for porn or for war, domination, conquest of a People, is evil beyond the pale. then bragging about it, sharing the pics… gawd.

    this is just disgusting that we’re even having this conversation. do we really have to nitpick this one? is that what we’ve come to?

    sigh

    NOTE I agree with Inky to the extent that if info or a pic is of “questionable origin”*, better not to present it as “proof” or “fact”… however… my beef is not so much with a person who does that as it is with our government who would challenge & appeal the higher court’s decision to honor the FOIA mandate to release the fucking REAL photo’s in the first place, so that a debate such as this isnt even necessary.

    *ANYTHING is “questionable origin”… sigh again…  dont make me explain this on only one cuppa.

    NOTE I also agree with Diane re putting the “burden of proof” on the victim etc…

    jeezzzzuz.

  8. article on the rape photos (included) as being discussed here.  I think the author pins it down very well!   The Grudge Report.

  9. in the matter of 21st century revolution:

    The Coming Insurrection

    Change the World Without Taking Power

  10. I was once a psychologist in another state where one could qualify for licensure with a master’s degree, provided that they passed the same national exam required of Ph.D. psychologists (EPPP) and met numerous other requirements, including supervised work experience and passed an oral exam before the State Board of Psychology.  

    Master’s level psychology licensure is not an option in the state where I’ve resided for nearly two and a half decades, however, I’m a National Certified Counselor (NCC), which, thankfully, applies to all fifty states.  

    I’ve worked in the mental health field for more than three decades and still find that every day brings with it new discoveries about how and why people think and act as they do. Considerable expert witness testimony (along with the dubious pleasures of cross examination) has taught me to avoid mislabeling opinions as facts, or alternatively, probabilities as absolutes.

    Working in this field, in institutional settings with those who have been involuntarily committed by the courts,  has been (and continues to be) a wonderful privilege. Ensuring public safety, to the greatest extent possible, while at the same time treating the individual can sometimes become a delicate balancing act.

    When one realizes that if they’d been dealt the same hand in life as one of their most challenged clients (which oftentimes includes mental illness, alcohol/drug dependency, physical and/or emotional trauma, broken homes, abuse of all kinds, etc.) and cannot be absolutely certain that they would have fared much differently, it can become a very humbling experience.  

    Most of us have been fortunate to this point in our lives, not having had mothers who used alcohol/drugs to excess during their pregnancies with us, severely mistreated by neglectful or abusive parents/surrogative caregivers, and/or witnessing horrifying events, such as one parent beating the other on a recurrent basis.  

    One can easily become complacent, secure in the belief that since we’ve reached our current station in life with our mental health relatively intact, that we are home free for the duration. Although schizophrenia (one of the most common forms of mental illness) oftentimes surfaces in the late teen years or early twenties, there seem to be just enough clients whose life histories do not conform to this pattern to threaten that false sense of security.  

    Some clients lead very normal and sometimes very productive lives until incurring a traumatic head injury, after which their lives, as well as that of their family members, are forever changed.  Sometimes people can function reasonably well until some triggering event sets a chain of setbacks in motion that leads to an initial psychotic break, such as a failed love relationship, death of a family member, or job loss.  Regardless of how well insulated we may think we are, all it takes is one person running a red light for us to share a similar, tragic fate.

    Any day that we can function reasonably well and independently in this world is truly a gift that we should deeply appreciate.    

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