HONORING THE FALLEN: US Military KIA, Iraq/Afghanistan – October 2008

(10 am. – promoted by ek hornbeck)

Iraq

If you visit any of the lists of the KIA’s or Injured in the Iraq Theater one thing you’ll find, the Only Occupation Forces numbers rising, being Killed and Maimed, are American Forces these last number of months!! I find myself wondering how many are on a first tour, or second, or third, or forth…………………………….., in Both Theaters!!

There have been 4,503 coalition deaths — 4,189 Americans, 2 Australians, 1 Azerbaijani, 176 Britons, 13 Bulgarians, 1 Czech, 7 Danes, 2 Dutch, 2 Estonians, 1 Fijian, 5 Georgians, 1 Hungarian, 33 Italians, 1 Kazakh, 1 Korean, 3 Latvian, 22 Poles, 3 Romanians, 5 Salvadoran, 4 Slovaks, 11 Spaniards, 2 Thai and 18 Ukrainians — in the war in Iraq as of October 3, 2008, according to a CNN count. { Graphical breakdown of casualties }. The list below is the names of the soldiers, Marines, airmen, sailors and Coast Guardsmen whose deaths have been reported by their country’s governments. The list also includes seven employees of the U.S. Defense Department. At least 30,757 U.S. troops have been wounded in action, according to the Pentagon. View casualties in the war in Afghanistan.

Sgt. Scott J. Metcalf 36  1st Squadron, 32nd Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division Framingham, Massachusetts Died of injuries sustained in a non-combat related incident in Balad, Iraq, on October 29, 2008

Pfc. Cody J. Eggleston 21 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division Eugene, Oregon Died on October 24, 2008, at the National in Bethesda, Maryland, of wounds suffered when he received indirect fire in Baquba, Iraq, on October 16.

Staff Sgt. Brian P. Hause 29 20th Equipment Maintenance Squadron Stoystown, Pennsylvania Died of non-combat related medical causes at Balad Air Base, Iraq, on October 23, 2008

Lance Cpl. Stacy A. Dryden  22  1st Supply Battalion, 1st Marine Logistics Group  North Canton, Ohio  Died of injuries sustained in a non-hostile incident in Anbar province, Iraq, on October 19, 2008

Pfc. Heath K. Pickard  21  1st Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division  Palestine, Texas  Died of wounds suffered when he received indirect fire in Baquaba, Iraq, on October 16, 2008

Spc. Justin A. Saint  22  Special Troops Battalion, XVIII Airborne Corps  Albertville, Alabama  Died of injuries sustained in a non-combat related incident in Baghdad, Iraq, on October 15, 2008

Pfc. Christopher A. McCraw  23  1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade, 25th Infantry Division  Columbia, Mississippi  Died of wounds suffered when he enocuntered small-arms fire while on dismounted patrol in Nasar Wa Salam, Iraq, on October 14, 2008

Spc. Geoffrey G. Johnson  28  Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Division Special Troops Battalion, 4th Infantry Division  Lubbock, Texas  Died of injuries sustained from a non-combat related incident in Baghdad, Iraq, on October 12, 2008

Sgt. Reuben M. Fernandez III  22  2nd Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division  Abilene, Texas  Died of wounds sustained when his vehcile struck a roadside bomb in Majar Al Kabir, Iraq, on October 11, 2008

Sgt. Michael K. Clark  24  1st Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division  Sacramento, California  Died of wounds suffered when he encountered small-arms fire while on dismounted patrol in Mosul, Iraq, on October 7, 2008

Sgt. William P. Rudd  27  3rd Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment  Madisonville, Kentucky  Died of wounds suffered from enemy small-arms fire while on a combat patrol in Mosul, Iraq, on October 5, 2008

Col. Michael R. Stahlman  45  Headquarters Battalion, Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center  Chevy Chase, Maryland  Died on October 5, 2008, of injuries sustained in a non-hostile incident in Anbar province, Iraq, on July 31.

Pfc. Tavarus D. Setzler  23  2nd Squadron, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division  Jacksonville, Florida  Died of wounds sustained when his vehicle struck a roadside bomb in Majar al Kabir, Iraq, on October 2, 2008

Afghanistan – The Still Forgotten War – and The Third Front Pakistan

There have been 995 coalition deaths — 620 Americans, 6 Australians, 121 Britons, 97 Canadians, 3 Czech, 16 Danes, 17 Dutch, 3 Estonians, 1 Finn, 22 French, 23 Germans, 2 Hungarian, 12 Italians, 1 Latvian, 1 Lithuanian, 1 NATO/ISAF, 3 Norwegians, 8 Poles, 2 Portuguese, 8 Romanians, 1 South Korean, 23 Spaniards, 2 Swedes — in the war on terror as of October 3, 2008, according to a CNN count. Below are the names of the soldiers, Marines, airmen and sailors whose deaths have been reported by their country’s governments. The troops died in support of the U.S.-led Operation Enduring Freedom or were part of the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Afghanistan. At least 2,548 U.S. personnel have been wounded in action, according to the Pentagon.

Sgt. Nicholas A. Casey  22  3rd Battalion, 7th Special Forces Group  Canton, Ohio  One of two soldiers killed when a suicide bomber detonated explosives as they were preparing to enter a building in Baghlan, Afghnaistan, on October 27, 2008

Sgt. Kevin D. Grieco  35  2nd Battalion, 122nd Field Artillery, Illinois Army National Guard   Bartlett, Illinois   One of two soldiers killed when a suicide bomber detonated explosives as they were preparing to enter a building in Baghlan, Afghnaistan, on October 27, 2008

1st Lt. Trevor J. Yurista 32  5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force  Pleasant Valley, New York   Died while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on October 27, 2008

Spc. Deon L. Taylor 30  27th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, New York Army National Guard Bronx, New York Died of wounds suffered when his vehicle encountered a roadside bomb in Bela Beluk, Afghanistan, on October 22, 2008

Cpl. Adrian Robles  21  2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force  Scottsbluff, Nebraska  One of two Marines killed while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on October 22, 2008

Lance Cpl. San Sim  23  1st Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force  Santa Ana, California  One of two Marines killed while supporting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan, on October 22, 2008

Capt. Robert D. Lindenau  39  91st Civil Affairs Battalion, 95th Civil Affairs Brigade  Camano Island, Washington  Died of wounds suffered when a rocket-propelled grenade struck his vehicle in Charbagh, Afghanistan, on October 20, 2008

Sgt. Federico G. Borjas  33  416th Civil Affairs Battalion, 351st Civil Affairs Command  San Diego, California  Died of wounds suffered from small-arms fire during a dismounted patrol in Bermel District Center, Afghanistan, on October 16, 2008

Sgt. John M. Penich  25  1st Battalion, 26th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division  Beach Park, Illinois  Died of wounds suffered from indirect fire in Karangol Village, Afghanistan, on October 16, 2008

Trooper James Munday 21 1 Troop, D Squadron, Household Cavalry Regiment  Birmingham, England  Killed by a contact explosion during a routine patrol approximately 14 miles (23 km) north of Forward Operating Base Delhi in Helmand province, Afghanistan, October 15, 2008

Spc. Cory J. Bertrand  18  1st Battalion, 26th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division  Center, Texas  One of three soldiers killed when their vehicle encountered a roadside bomb in Qazi Bandeh, Afghanistan, on October 14, 2008

Spc. Stephen R. Fortunato  25  1st Battalion, 26th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division  Danvers, Massachusetts  One of three soldiers killed when their vehicle encountered a roadside bomb in Qazi Bandeh, Afghanistan, on October 14, 2008

Sgt. Preston R. Medley  23  1st Battalion, 26th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division  Baker, Florida  One of three soldiers killed when their vehicle encountered a roadside bomb in Qazi Bandeh, Afghanistan, on October 14, 2008

Pfc. Scott G. Dimond  39  3rd Battalion, 172nd Infantry Regiment (Mountain), New Hampshire Army National Guard  Franklin, New Hamphshire  Died of wounds suffered when his vehicle struck a roadside bomb and his patrol was engaged in a small-arms fire attack in Kandahar, Afghanistan, on October 13, 2008

Cpl. Jason A. Karella  20  2nd Battalion, 7th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, 1st Marine Expeditionary Force  Charlotte, North Carolina  Died during combat operations in Farah province, Afghanistan, on October 9, 2008

Spc. Jason E. von Zerneck  33  2nd Squadron, 101st Cavalry Regiment, New York Army National Guard  Charlotte, North Carolina  Died of injuries sustained from a vehicle incident in Qara Bagh Karez, Afghanistan, on October 2, 2008

Civilian Casulties – Iraq

Just Foreign Policy Issues

Over a million {*1,284,105} Iraqis are estimated to have been killed as a result of the U.S.-led invasion and occupation. Learn More and Take Action»

*Estimate, click for explaination

.

To

John Hopkins School of Public Health { October 11, 2006 report } puts the count at 650,000, with a range from 400,000 to 900,000.

Exact Count of Civilian Casulties may never be known, as is the case in every conflict, especially an Invasion by another Country. For it is the Innocent Civilians and those Defending their Countries {of which All would be counted if this land were ever invaded} who suffer the most, during and long after!

Iraq Refugees UNHCR: UNHCR Global Appeal 2008-2009 – Iraq Situation

Filetype: PDF (116k)

All the Deaths, Maimings and Destruction are the Blood on All Our Hands, No One can escape the Guilt!

September 2008, August 2008, July 2008, June 2008, May 2008, April 2008, March 2008, Febuary 2008, January 2008, December 2007, November 2007, October 2007, September 2007, August 2007, July 2007, June 2007, May 2007, April 2007, March 2007, Feb. 2007, Jan. 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003

You can view other Honor Rolls of the Fallen I have posted on my site {links above}, or from the CNN link at top and the other sources that you might use or know about.



As Of November 2,  2008, There Are 90 Pages w/5 ‘Silent Honor Rolls’ Each, Number Of Casulties Varies With Each ‘Silent Honor Roll’; Many now have numbers in the teens and twenties, click on graphic.

A Nations Security Does Not Mean A Nation Sets An Example Of Creating More Hatreds And Enemies By

    ‘Wars Of Choice’

, Nor By Installing And Supporting Dictators, It Leads By The Example Of Peace And Prevention, Especially As A Democracy, Gaining Friends And Supporters, And Defends With Force Only When All Other Options Are Exhausted



97 percent of U.S. deaths in Iraq have occurred after George W. Bush declared an end to “major combat.”

“Mission Accomplished!”

The Rand Corporation Terrorism Report the press release here, you can get the  full document here or a summary of the research brief here

If they were sent to fight, they are too few. If they were sent to die, they are too many!

Those who take some sort of relief in the “We are fighting them over there so we won’t be fighting them here!”, Better Rethink their Future, or rather their Childrens Future!!

“Victory means exit strategy, and it’s important for the president to explain to us what the exit strategy is,”  – George W. Bush, Texas Gov., 1999


” What does it matter to the dead, the orphan, and the homeless whether the mad destruction is wrought under the name of totalitarianism or the holy name of liberty or democracy?”

– Mohandas K. Gandhi

The Failed Policies will Haunt Us and the World for Decades!!

Added 8-3-08, Jones, from ‘Freedom Fries’ to Understanding Reality!

Bill would open military funerals to media

Rep. Walter B. Jones, R-N.C., said Friday that legislation he co-sponsored this week would highlight the sacrifices made by members of the military.

And To Think We, the United States,  Need A Congressional Bill For The Above???

Get Out And VOTE If You Haven’t Already!!

2 comments

    • jimstaro on November 2, 2008 at 3:03 pm
      Author

    Topic: Employment After Service Beyond Basic Training Chapter 1

    Originally aired on October 29th, 2008

    Beyond Basic Training

    After being medically retired from the Army, Iraq veteran Kevin Randolph and his family are without options. They move to a transitional housing facility, and Kevin must enter one of the worst job markets in recent history to support his wife and their new baby.

    Elise Randolph

    Army Wife

    Gracie Broll

    Director

    Operation Homefront Village

    Kevin Randolph

    Army Specialist (Ret.) Kevin Randolph joined the service straight out of high school. In 2003, he started in the Air Force and in 2005 switched to Army. He deployed to Iraq out of Fort Drum, New York in 2006. Six months into his deployment Kevin was hit with an IED, which broke his fibulae, tore his meniscus and did a lot of irreparable damage to his knee and leg. Since returning stateside, the 23-year-old vet received a disability discharge and was forced to move his family off of base, and move back into the civilian world with no job and only $1,000 per month from the Army. Like many vets, Kevin has struggled with reintegrating. Now, he and his wife Elise and their new baby Zeppelin live in a transitional housing facility in San Antonio, while Kevin awaits his VA benefits and looks for employment in an unraveling job market.

    Elise Randolph

    Elise met Kevin shortly after he returned from Iraq, and it wasn’t long before they were married and had baby Zeppelin on the way. Without any other options, the young family moved into Operation Homefront Village in San Antonio, where they currently reside. There, Elise is able to get financial help with buying diapers and other baby needs, while Kevin tries to find a job. Now the stakes are higher. Elise recently found out she’s pregnant again, which means she’ll have two babies to care for with an unclear financial future. Once Kevin gets his VA benefits, they have to leave Operation Homefront, whether Kevin has a job or not.

    • Edger on November 2, 2008 at 3:36 pm

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