Poem Against Land Theft, McCain, & Hate Crimes

(6 pm. – promoted by ek hornbeck)

Esoteric spiritual madness has accompanied me as I have watched the continuing web of land theft spreading, still, from the Arctic to across the United States.

I know why, but I don’t know why. I have watched Manifest Destiny pair with Climate Change on what is a repetition of land theft from the gun to the gavel. I have watched a leading Republican presidential candidate who is getting away with having enacted legislation that forcefully removed the Navajo. That’s the last straw. The straw that breaks the camel’s back is hate crimes that don’t get noticed by the general public like other hate crimes would.


Two Indian men, ages 48 and 24, were on their way home when they were confronted by a group of men and women in “white pride” t-shirts. The men were attacked early Sunday morning.

Even though this web of land theft continues, that McCain is getting away with his Forced Relocation, and that these hate crimes won’t receive attention in the main media or by the general public without a miracle – “I will not hate the White Man.”

I will not hate the White Man,

Though he encroaches on the land.

He has not yet realized my people are his,

And his is mine this time again.

I will not hate the White Man,

Though he’s made languages fade away.

His lands are lost from him,

He needs someone to pay.

I will not hate the White Man,

Though he glorifies genocide.

He cannot stop fighting his crusades and wars,

His heart from himself he hides.

I will not hate the White Man,

The One Direction won’t let it be.

We both go through chaos and change,

Throughout eternity.

I will not hate the White Man,

But I will not be like him.

I forgive him for Christianizing my clan,

That I’ll never see again.

I forgive the White Man,

And though my land is long lost.

I’ll keep that medicine deep,

Deep within my heart.

I’ll never be the White Man.


Consent decree signed in Maine hate crime case

AUGUSTA, Maine-Five people accused of threatening and assaulting a group of Native Americans in eastern Maine have been ordered to stay away from the victims as part of a consent decree.

– snip –

The defendants are accused of getting out of their car armed with two-by-fours, sticks and pipes, yelling racial epithets and assaulting some of the Indians.


Men attacked members of Passamaquoddy Tribe

“Come on, let’s get the Indians,” one of the men said, according to a complaint filed by the state. Other anti-Indian slurs were yelled during the attack.


The McCain Relocation

Now, onto John McCain when he entered politics in 1981 in Arizona in relation to the forced relocation. It was easy for him, for it all was set in place. The gun was loaded and all McCain had to do was keep pulling the trigger with S1973-1 and S.1003.

(underline & emphasis mine)


Source

ACSA has determined that the law in question (25 U.S.C. 640d-11) has been amended many times, since it’s introduction by Congressman Wayne Owens, and signed into law by President Gerald Ford in 1974. Among the key amendments introduced by Senator McCain were the organization of a Hopi-Navajo Resettlement Commission (a Commission actually charged with relocating the Dineh-Navaho) and modifying the Settlement allegedly agreed to by the Hopi-Navajo to remove any Dineh who sought sanctuary legally under their membership in the Hopi “parent culture” of all Indians in America.  These and other amendments were introduced by Senator McCain as public law in 1996 through 1999, and some were submitted to the Senate and House in 2005 as PL S.1003,
subsequently incorporated into the language of the 2005 amendment of 25 U.S.C. 40d-11, all to rig the situation for the Senator’s sponsors, Peabody Western Coal Company (Peabody Group today) and Bechtel, who operates the Mohave Generating Station, so they could more easily remove the coal from the Dineh-Navaho’s rightful properties.

Within the legal maneuverings of Senator McCain, the non-existent tribal counsel, called: the “Hopi-Navajo Counsel”, made up of Peabody Group proxies of local Kayenta, Arizona area origin, surfaced false claims of prior ownership and eminent domain, and then successfully testified before the Senate (the Dineh were not invited to testify about their own fate before the Senate by Senator McCain, leading to a hue and cry in 1999)
and demanded the removal of the rightful landowners, the Dineh-Navajo, claiming “encroachment on lands granted us by President Chester A. Arthur.” They demand completion of the removal of the Dineh-Navaho from the Black Mesa and Big Mountain.


Sturgis students study Bear Butte controversy

The group’s proposal addressed an ongoing controversy surrounding Bear Butte outside Sturgis that has pitted developers against members of several American Indian tribes that consider the landmark a sacred place of worship.

I will not hate the White Man,

Though he encroaches on the land.

He has not yet realized my people are his,

And his is mine this time again.

I will not hate the White Man,

Though he’s made languages fade away.

His lands are lost from him,

He needs someone to pay.

I will not hate the White Man,

Though he glorifies genocide.

He cannot stop fighting his crusades and wars,

His heart from himself he hides.

I will not hate the White Man,

The One Direction won’t let it be.

We both go through chaos and change,

Throughout eternity.

I will not hate the White Man,

But I will not be like him.

I forgive him for Christianizing my clan,

That I’ll never see again.

I forgive the White Man,

And though my land is long lost.

I’ll keep that medicine deep,

Deep within my heart.

I’ll never be the White Man.

19 comments

Skip to comment form

    • OPOL on October 5, 2008 at 4:06 pm

    Just excellent.  Thank you brother.

    • OPOL on October 5, 2008 at 4:13 pm

    I will keep that medicine deep within my heart.

    Mitakuye Oyasin.

    • kj on October 5, 2008 at 5:46 pm

    R. Carlos Nakai & Nawang Khechog

    • kj on October 5, 2008 at 5:48 pm

    beautiful beautiful beautiful.  Thank you.

    • Diane G on October 5, 2008 at 7:07 pm

    to purge the hatred I carry for the White man’s indifference and abuse of the First Nations. I suppose my training as a white make its hate hard to eliminate.

    I’m so sorry my friend, that so few ears hear anymore. I wish I knew how to wake the world to the human rights abuses at home, but people are blind to themselves, or carry too much guilt and look away.

    My love to you, this is a thing of beauty.

    Diane

    • Valtin on October 7, 2008 at 7:21 am

    These are human traits. We try not to yield totally to them. Using poetry to do that is an excellent way, and your poem is truly excellent, WR!

    I cannot give up the hate I have in my heart for the terror and oppression that is the legacy of the white man, and for any ruling clique that rules by virtue of exploitation and injustice.

    Some of us need our hate to keep us going. But hate tempered by love of humanity. A heady brew.

Comments have been disabled.