The (Un)authorized Pictorial History of Daily Kos Blogging

Crossposted at Daily Kos



Patrick Chappatte, International Herald Tribune, Buy this cartoon

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Warning: This pictorial version of Daily Kos’ history has not as yet been reviewed or approved by our Community Director Lord Protector, Meteor Blades.  Were he to look it over, I have no doubt he would heartily agree with its content.

It is, as we say in the blogging world, subject to revisionist interpretations.  Opinions are not in short supply on this blog.

In the beginning, someone said, “Let there be blogs.”  And, bingo, blogging was born.  In all sorts of blogs, experts came out of the woodwork hellbent on ensuring that we, the uninformed, took advantage of their expertise though they neglected to tell us what it was they excelled at.  Fairly soon, a few experts led to, you guessed it, more experts.  

If author Aldous Huxley were alive today, surely his important novel Brave New World would contain nothing but chapter after chapter about the intricacies, nuances, and subtleties involved in being an expert blogger.  



Pat Bagley, Salt Lake Tribune, Buy this cartoon

Grand Avenue

Grand Avenue, Comics.com



Frederick Deligne, Nice-Matin (France), Buy this cartoon

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With so many experts wanting to enlighten us with their knowledge and wisdom (something they could not do enough of in comments only), diaries were introduced.  Now, all these other experts really could educate us on the mysteries of life and the very purpose of our existence on this planet.  An important blogging axiom: if an expert cannot opine, he/she ceases to be one and would by default, if not by design, give up that exalted title.

Before you knew it, hundreds of diaries were being written over all kinds of topics from the economic impact of growing Belgian endives to stimulating the American economy to the many reincarnations of pop idol Madonna.  

‘Diary Stars’ were being born every day, so it seemed.  Daily Kos would soon replace Encyclopaedia Britannica as the world’s foremost authority on everything.



John Cole, Scranton Times-Tribune, Buy this cartoon

Frank & Ernest

Frank and Ernest, Comics.com



Mike Lester, Rome News-Tribune, Buy this cartoon

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More diaries would lead to a proliferation of reader comments and the introduction of such fancy words as ‘asdf,’ ‘aeou,’ and ‘n/t’.  Never in the history of the modern world was language being enriched so completely and so quickly. Lurkers marveled at the command of the English language displayed by commentators on this blog.  Naturally, an increase in comments led to more comments and use of intricate words like ‘meme,’ whose meaning and purpose has eluded us commoners.

Diaries and comments were being supplemented with round-the-clock announcements about diaries and comments through other social networking tools such as Twitter and MySpace.  You would have thought that blogging had reached its high point.  But, you would be wrong too.



Jim Day, Las Vegas Review-Journal, Buy this cartoon



Joe Heller, Green Bay Press-Gazette, Buy this cartoon

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More comments led to more friction and infighting resulting in something called ‘Flaming.’  Translated, it simply meant mild disagreement with a commentator though expressed with a great deal of passion and rage in a distinctly uncivil fashion and manner undeserving of, well, thinking persons.  

Frank & Ernest

Frank and Ernest, Comics.com

Rudy Park

Rudy Park, Comics.com

Frank & Ernest

Frank and Ernest, Comics.com

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Although beset with problems, the Daily Kos model was widely admired by friends and foes alike. The political world had never seen anything like it.  Imitation in politics, they say, is the sincerest form of flattery.  So it was the case with the 2008 McCain-Palin Presidential Campaign as they borrowed our tactics to use upon our candidate.

Taking these blogging tactics to new heights, they launched attack upon attack in the blogosphere. They failed miserably.



Bob Englehart, Hartford Courant, Buy this cartoon



Patrick Chappatte, International Herald Tribune, Buy this cartoon



RJ Matson, St. Louis Post Dispatch, Buy this cartoon

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So, where does that leave us today?  We are at a crossroads.  To paraphrase Winston Churchill, this is neither the beginning nor the end.  It could, however, be the beginning of the end.  Or, as Bob Dylan wrote many moons ago, “the answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind.”

Ponder that for a second.  Happy blogging!

Grand Avenue

Grand Avenue, Comics.com



Joe Heller, Green Bay Press-Gazette, Buy this cartoon



Frederick Deligne, Le Pelerin (France), Buy this cartoon

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6 comments

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  1. … for a second, William Shakespeare made great contributions and came up with all of these wonderful phrases in the English language.  

    What have you done for this world or your blog today?

    On Quoting Shakespeare

    If you cannot understand my argument, and declare “It’s Greek to me,” you are quoting Shakespeare; if you claim to be more sinned against than sinning, you are quoting Shakespeare; if you recall your salad days, you are quoting Shakespeare; if you act more in sorrow than in anger; if your wish is farther to the thought; if your lost property has vanished into thin air, you are quoting Shakespeare; if you have ever refused to budge an inch or suffered from green-eyed jealousy, if you have played fast and loose, if you have been tongue-tied, a tower of strength, hoodwinked or in a pickle, if you have knitted your brows, made a virtue of necessity, insisted on fair play, slept not one wink, stood on ceremony, danced attendance (on your lord and master), laughed yourself into stitches, had short shrift, cold comfort or too much of a good thing, if you have seen better days or lived in a fool’s paradise — why, be that as it may, the more fool you, for it is a foregone conclusion that you are (as good luck would have it) quoting Shakespeare; if you think it is early days and clear out bag and baggage, if you think it is high time and that that is the long and short of it, if you believe that the game is up and that truth will out even if it involves your own flesh and blood, if you lie low till the crack of doom because you suspect foul play, if you have your teeth set on edge (at one fell swoop) without rhyme or reason, then — to give the devil his due — if the truth were known (for surely you have a tongue in your head) you are quoting Shakespeare; even if you bid me good riddance and send me packing, if you wish I was dead as a door-nail, if you think I am an eyesore, a laughing stock, the devil incarnate, a stony-hearted villain, bloody-minded or a blinking idiot, then – by Jove! O Lord! Tut tut! For goodness’ sake! What the dickens! But me no buts! – it is all one to me, for you are quoting Shakespeare.

    Bernard Levin.  From The Story of English.  Robert McCrum, William Cran and Robert MacNeil.  

  2. I report, you decide.

  3. ..but thanks for posting this anyway.

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